Partners

European Researcher’s Night

The European Researchers’ Nights are events dedicated to popular science and fun learning. They are a unique opportunity to meet researchers, talk to them, and find out what they really do for society, in interactive and engaging ways. This can be through hands-on experiments, science shows, learning activities for children, guided visits of research labs, science quizzes, games, competitions with researchers and more.

The European Researchers’ Night takes place every year all over Europe and in neighbouring countries the last Friday of September. This year, the events will take place on Friday 29 September in over 300 cities.

The events are supported by the European Commission as part of the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions, which is an EU funding programme to boost the careers of researchers.

University of Oxford

The University of Oxford is a world-leading centre of learning, teaching and research and the oldest university in the English-speaking world.

Oxford is world-famous for research excellence and home to some of the most talented people from across the globe. Our work helps the lives of millions, solving real-world problems through a huge network of partnerships and collaborations. The breadth and interdisciplinary nature of our research sparks imaginative and inventive insights and solutions.

Oxford Brookes University

Oxford Brookes is thinking globally, growing our international footprint and furthering our already world-leading research. At Oxford Brookes University our research is impactful, world-leading and touches people’s lives in so many ways.

Researchers are busy influencing counter terrorism policy, aiding animal conservation and developing low carbon solutions to meet national and global energy challenges. We’re a world leader in robotics and artificial intelligence, we’ve developed resources to help combat human trafficking in the hospitality industry and we have a number of projects focussed on improving care for cancer patients.

MRC Harwell

MRC Harwell is at the international forefront of the use of mouse genetics to study the relationship between gene and disease. The models we create and study are used to understand the disease processes that occur when a gene goes wrong. The disease models can also be employed for the pre-clinical assessment of new drugs and other therapeutic approaches, before therapies are tried on humans.